Cisco UCM: backup to SFTP server

When you install Syncplify.me Server!, the installer deploys a very secure (PCI compliant) configuration. Such strong configuration, though, is not compatible with Cisco UCM backups, as Cisco UCM has a very outdated support for the SFTP protocol.

Setting all the protocol options and tweaks by hand, to properly support Cisco UCM, may be painful, as there are so many! But Syncplify.me Server! makes it easy by providing a handy drop-down list of ready-made configuration scenarios, including one that is ideal as a Cisco UCM backup target. Continue reading

Configuration Manager Default Password

If you are using Syncplify.me Server! version 1.x or 2.x, the first time you run the Configuration Manager, after installing the software, it displays a little “hint” regarding the default username and password to use at your first access.

Username: admin
Password: [there is no password, just leave the field empty]

As soon as you perform your first access, you will be required (it’s mandatory) to set a password for the admin user. This requirement is necessary for obvious security reasons.

Instead, if you are using Syncplify.me Server! version 3.x (or greater), the admin username and passwords are the ones you have chosen and set upon creation of your server instance. So there is no default value anymore, you will have to log in using username/password that you have set when you have created the particular instance you’re trying to access.

How to: turn a Temporary into a Permanent ban (blacklist)

By default all IP addresses that get automatically blacklisted (because of protocol violations or some other type of attack/hacking attempt) are Temporary. This means that they will stay in the blacklist for an amount of time that you have defined in the Configuration Manager and then they will be automatically removed from the blacklist and allowed to connect again.

But Syncplify.me Server! also supports Permanent bans. The image here below shows how to turn a Temporary ban into a Permanent one.

permanentban

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Running your SFTP server with high-availability and fault tolerance

Note: this article refers to Syncplify.me Server! v1.x and v2.x; As of Syncplify.me Server! v3.0 support for high-availability (HA) is built-in, and much easier to use; you can read more about v3.0 HA features here.

If you are running Syncplify.me Server! in a corporate environment, especially if you operate it in a mission critical environment, you may want to deploy it with high-availability (HA) and fault tolerance in mind.

The diagram here below, and the explanation that follows, are intended as a “first step” towards that goal. More complicated layouts are certainly possible, but this is a good starting point:

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How-to: map Syncplify.me Server! as a drive (Swish version)

We have recently published an article in this Knowledge Base to explain how to mount a Syncplify.me Server! SFTP account as a virtual drive using SFTP Net Drive.

It is also possible to do the same using another very nice software called Swish. Different philosophy, but similar results. Here is how to do it.

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How-to: map Syncplify.me Server! as a drive (SFTP)

There are several software programs on the market that can mount a SFTP (or also a FTP) server connection as a drive. Syncplify.me Server! strictly adheres to the standards, therefore it grants a very high degree of compatibility.

One option is to use SFTP Net Drive (by Eldos). Here’s a brief tutorial on how to map a SFTP connection as a drive using it together with Syncplify.me Server!

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Syncplify.me Server!: more on Active Directory authentication

This article covers the interaction between the client and Syncplify.me Server! in case of Active Directory authentication, and explains how auth-data sent by the client is interpreted by the server.

For the sake of our example we have set up a Windows Server 2012 R2 virtual machine, and created the “syncplify.local” domain (totally made up, you can use your own domain name of course). We have then created an AD group called “SFTP Users” (again you can create your own groups) and a couple users: “testuser” and “groupuser”. The testuser profile is only member of the “Domain Users” group, while the groupuser profile is member of “Domain Users” as well as of “SFTP Users”.

Important: if you’re using Syncplify.me Server! v4.0 or greater, please make sure you also carefully read this article before you continue.

Then we have created the two virtual profiles in Syncplify.me Server! with the usernames exactly as you see them in the picture here below:

2012R2-AD-1

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SFTP server on Windows: a step-by-step setup guide

Note: this article refers to an old version of the software, please consult this newer and updated article, which also features a video walk-through.

This step-by-step introductory guide is meant to help our users deploy and configure their SFTP server on Windows for the first time, and make sure that everything works well.

First of all, make sure that no other SFTP server is already running; and since Syncplify.me Server! also provides support for the FTP(S) protocol, please, also make sure no other FTP server is running on the same computer or virtual machine (this is particularly important if you’re installing Syncplify.me Server! onto a Windows Server operating system). A more comprehensive pre-flight check list is available here.

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Syncplify.me Server! and Active Directory user authentication

Besides it own internal user database, Syncplify.me Server! can authenticate users against the Windows user database and/or the Active Directory.

This article explains how to authenticate users against the Active Directory. A different article explains how to use the Windows (local) user database.

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