New OpenSSL bug: Syncplify customers are still 100% safe!

After only a couple months from the discovery of the “Heartbleed” bug that affected the popular open-source library OpenSSL, a new bug has been found that could potentially expose user’s data.

And once again, all Syncplify customers are 100% safe, because none of our product uses (or has ever used) any version of the OpenSSL library.

Press release: Syncplify.me software products are immune from the “heartbleed” OpenSSL bug

Media contacts:

Helga Kessler
Syncplify, Inc.
helga@syncplify.me

Syncplify.me Server!, FTP!, and FTP Script! implement a proprietary SSL/TLS stack that does not rely on OpenSSL, therefore they are not affected by the “heartbleed” OpenSSL bug; once again, Syncplify customers’ security and peace of mind are safeguarded.

WILMINGTON, DE – April 8, 2014 – Syncplify, Inc., a young yet award-winning software development company that delivers enterprise-grade secure file transfer solutions (FTPS/SFTP client and server), following the breaking news regarding the recently discovered OpenSSL bug named “heartbleed”, today announced that none of its products is or has ever been based on any version of such library. Therefore, all Syncplify products are immune from the published exploits.

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OpenSSL bug: our customers are safe (cause we don’t use it)!

heartbleedBreaking news: a terrifying (to say the least) bug in OpenSSL has been discovered and publicly disclosed. This serious security flaw affects OpenSSL’s heartbeat feature, and it’s therefore been named “heartbleed”.

We, at Syncplify, want to reassure all of our users and customers: none of our products uses or has ever used OpenSSL or any of its components.

Syncplify.me Server!, FTP!, and FTP Scrip!, all include a SSL/TLS stack that is not based on OpenSSL, and therefore is not affected by the recently discovered bug.

Once again, users of Syncplify software products are safe.

Video-lesson #3: backup with versioning and email notification

In this article we present a very simple FTP script that, in just a few lines of code, performs the following operations:

  • zips the contents of a folder
  • uploads the zip archive to an FTP server, renaming the old one (if exists, for versioning)
  • notifies the operator via email after the upload has completed

Here below you can see both the video (see it in action) and the actual code that has been used during the recording of such video. Continue reading