Syncplify.me Server! v4.2.0 released

We have just released version 4.2.0 of our Syncplify.me Server! software. This version features the following improvements:

  • Added: support for AWS Load Balancer’s “proxy protocol” (HAProxy protocol v1) to correctly identify the remote client IP address from multi-node load-balanced EC2 instances inside the AWS cloud
  • Added: AutoOptimizeSocket registry setting to automatically optimize the socket’s inbound/outbound buffer sizes and ultimately improve upload/download speed
  • Improved: performance and reliability of the [%USER_HOME%] finder function inside the VFS subsystem
  • Fixed: directory list timer and counter in the FTP protocol handler
  • Fixed: few other minor and rarely occurring issues

Warning: upgrading to this version from any version prior to 4.0.34 will invalidate your license, so please if you are a customer – before you upgrade – contact us to request a license reset.

Note: if after the update you notice any unexpected behavior in the web interface, just hit Ctrl-F5 in your browser; that will force the browser to reload the page as well as all back-end scripts and update the ones that may have been cached from previous versions of the software.

As usual you can download this new release from our website.

The Journey from FTP to SFTP

You can also download this white-paper for offline use by scrolling to the bottom of this article.

File transfer is an important aspect in computing. There is always a need for us to transfer files between a source and a destination. While in the earlier days, certain protocols were used to manage file transfers between the client and server, security was not much of a concern then. But, with the advancements in computing and rise of different kind of intrusions, security gradually became a pressing need. Yes, you guessed right. I am talking about FTP and SFTP. Let’s take a look at the journey from FTP to SFTP.

The standard network protocol File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is used to transfer files between a client system and a server. According to Wikipedia, the FTP ran on NCP specification until 1980. After that the protocol was replaced by a TCP/IP version named RFC 765 and consequently by RFC 959 in October 1985. RFC 959 is the current specification which FTP follows.

According to the latest specification, FTP should fulfill 4 major objectives namely: Continue reading

How secure is the SFTP protocol?

Many of our users know the FTP protocol very well, and they are aware that FTPS is the same protocol protected by a SSL/TLS connection. But when it comes to SFTP, we’re challenged pretty frequently with the question “how secure is SFTP?“.

The easy one-line answer would be: SFTP is very secure. But that is obviously not a real answer, therefore if you want to know more (and why/how it is secure), please, read on.

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Syncplify.me Server!: why so many “ports” to configure?

Some of our users have been asking why there are so many “ports” to configure in Syncplify.me Server! and if configuring them is really necessary.

First of all, let’s say that Syncplify.me Server! is designed to work out-of-the-box, without the need for any special reconfiguration. In fact, by default, it uses the ports defined in each protocol standard (21 and 20 for FTP, 990 and 989 for FTPS, and 22 for SFTP) plus the widest possible port-range for passive FTP(S) connections.

Continue reading