A great SFTP client for Mac? Here it is!

Quite often our Syncplify.me Server! customers and users contact us asking for recommendations regarding the choice of an SFTP client for MacOSX.

Of course there are several options out there. And then there’s Commander One by Eltima Software, the two-pane file manager for MacOSX that will make you forget anything else you’ve tried before on the Apple platform.

Not only it supports FTP, FTPS and SFTP, but also provides some highly desirable features like dual-pane tabbed browsing, support for compressed archives, regular-expression file searches, and even server-to-server file copies.

Our developers here at Syncplify have downloaded it and tested it thoroughly, and Commander One turned out to be an excellent software product, well designed, feature rich, and easy to use. For such reasons we feel comfortable recommending it to our users and customers as a great Mac client to connect to our Syncplify.me Server!

How to protect your backups from ransomware (Cryptolocker, WannaCry, and the like…)

Syncplify.me Server! version: 4.0.0+

Ransomware is a type of malware that restricts access to the infected computer system, and demands that the user pay a ransom to the malware operators to remove the restriction. Probably the most famous ransomware is Cryptolocker, and it’s definitely something you don’t want to deal with.

Regardless of the strenuous efforts put in place by Antivirus developers, the rate of infection is appalling. And what is worse is that such ransomware can also access all the shared folders on your NAS/SAN, so if you backup to a network drive your backups will be compromised too. The ransomware objectives include, in fact, preventing you from being able to restore your old (healthy) data from a backup.

Managing such situation with permissions and ACL (access-control lists) is a nightmare, and it’s hard to reach a true WORM (write once read many) situation which is the only truly secure way to prevent the ransomware from modifying the backups you’ve already stored. And if you have healthy backups the ransomware is “de facto” already defeated.

So what can you do to store your backups somewhere else in a truly WORM way? Continue reading